For Hygiene and Allergy Control  
sterilray_logo
  
 
 
 
 

 
 

Hospital Disinfection

Protect your patients and caregivers

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) highlighted the importance of utilizing contact precautions for mitigating the transmission of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE), underscoring the critical importance of a total protocol that includes proper hand washing, gloving, masking (for MRSA), gowning, and appropriate practices for handling devices and laundry, emphasizing the need for daily surface disinfection.

In recognition of institution-induced infection on patient outcomes and healthcare costs, the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) released strengthened infection control guidelines. In addition to raising awareness that infections can be acquired in any healthcare setting, including hospitals, ambulatory care, home care, and long-term care organizations, the new guidelines also address emerging anti microbial resistance.

When portable equipment is carried by health care workers, including stethoscopes, blood pressure cuffs, otoscopes, pens, and pagers,1 microorganisms can be carried directly to patients or transferred to furniture or equipment. As a result, microorganisms are unwittingly transferred between patients. Many surfaces in the room can be affected, including bed rails, bed tables, linens, wheelchairs, thermometers, pulse oximeters, patient gowns, privacy curtains, patient charts, and doorknobs. Nurses’ gloves become contaminated 42 percent of the time after touching contaminated surfaces. 2

Despite the best efforts of healthcare facilities to maintain a clean and safe environment, contact transfer of harmful microorganisms seems to be inevitable. Studies have shown that, in rooms of patients who were colonized or infected with life-threatening pathogens, 70 percent of environmental surfaces were contaminated with potentially harmful microorganisms, 3 and 65 percent of healthcare workers’ gowns were contaminated with MRSA after routine morning care for patients with MRSA in a wound or patient’s urine. 4

References:
1. Muto C., Jernigan, J., Ostrowsky B., Richet H., Jarvis W., Boyce J., and Farr B. "SHEA Guideline for Preventing Nosocomial Transmission of Multidrug-Resistant Strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus". Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2003, 367.
2. Boyce J.M. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 1997; 18:622-627.
3. Boyce J.M. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 1997;18:622.
4. Muto C., Jernigan J., Ostrowsky B., Richet H., Jarvis W., Boyce J., and Farr B. "SHEA Guideline for Preventing Nosocomial Transmission of Multidrug-Resistant Strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus". Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2003, 367

 

 
Far-UV Sterilray Disinfection Wand
 
 

Copyright © 2008 HEI | Home | About | Technology | Copyright Notice | Terms & Policies | Website Use | Contact Us | Tel: 603-617-3759